iD by Madeline Ashby

iD by Madeline AshbyTitle: iD
Series: The Machine Dynasty #2
Author: 
Madeline Ashby
Publisher:
Angry Robot
Published:
25 June 2013
Genre: 
science fiction
Source:
 eARC from the publisher via NetGalley
Rating:
 7/10

Please note: this review contains spoilers for vN (The Machine Dynasty #1). It’s essential to start there, and I highly recommend checking this series out. If you haven’t you can read my review of vN here.

At the end of vN, Amy defeated her grandmother Portia by raising the body of a massive group of vN beneath the ocean. Their combined processing power has given her god-like powers which she has since used to design and create her own island – a customised vN paradise where Amy has paid close attention to even the tiniest details, like the timing of the breeze and the width of the tree branches.

Amy’s immense power allows her to watch over everyone, and she has built strong trade relationships to help her island flourish. She and Javier – whose POV we follow for this story – are enjoying a peaceful, idyllic existence with Javier’s iterations and a growing vN population. Their only major problem is sex – Javier wants it, but Amy refuses him because, with his failsafe, she’s not sure if he can choose to have sex with her or if he’s just programmed to. Having seen how humans exploit vN, she’s afraid of doing the same to him, but the issue is causing a lot of tension between them.

But obviously their wonderful life won’t last long anyway. Amy already terrifies humanity because she doesn’t have a failsafe and isn’t forced to adore and protect humans. Now she’s probably the most powerful being on the planet, but without any concern for her creators. Then when she takes drastic measures to protect the island from a high-tech intruder, Javier also becomes deeply concerned about the power she wields because she holds power over other vN too.

With his mind in tumult, Javier makes some poor decisions and is manipulated into doing something so terrible that he loses Amy, his iterations, and his home, while unleashing a danger that could start an apocalyptic war between humans and vN. He spends the rest of the novel trying desperately to be reunited with Amy, while society edges toward chaos around him.

Like vN, iD is a mixture of action and dire adventure tied up with social revolution. But most importantly – and most enjoyably – it explores an experience of being AI, specifically the experience of being a humanoid robot designed to be a servant and sex slave for humans. What does this mean for the relationship between humans and AI? As Ashby has pointed out, the vN aren’t human but they think of themselves as people. They simply have a different kind of subjectivity, a different way of experiencing the world. But what happens when the humans believe vN aren’t ‘real’ people? The possibilities are often scary, but that’s exactly what makes this such an interesting, memorable series.

vN was told from the perspective of Amy, who enjoyed a privileged life in a relatively normal family and had a lot to learn about the status of vN in the world. Javier’s POV gives us what is undoubtedly the more common experience for vN – a much more sordid world of disempowerment and sexual exploitation. In a series of flashbacks we learn about Javier’s very brief childhood, when he was abandoned by his father and locked up in a Nicaraguan prison. He grew very quickly, both mentally and physically. After escaping from prison he remained homeless and unemployed, prostituting himself to humans and finding something similar to a home only during brief stints as someone’s sexual companion. While he often lacks knowledge that a human adult would have attained, it’s often easy to forget that Javier is only four years old, especially since he’s had more sexual experiences than most humans would have in a lifetime, and he already has thirteen children and one grandchild.

iD might have been more of a love story if Javier’s strategy wasn’t to fuck his way back to the woman he loves. But that’s what he does best – he’s great in bed, and his failsafe means that his pleasure is dependant on his partner’s. He plans to seduce the people he needs to get to Amy. However, if sex is Javier’s greatest strength, it’s also one of his greatest, most disturbing weaknesses. Because of his failsafe, Javier can’t choose to say no to a human and can’t fight them, which basically means that any human can easily rape him if they want to. Because he’s a robot they can’t hurt him physically, but that doesn’t make it any less of a violation.

Take into account the fact that this applies to all vN except Amy and you’ll get an idea of the content in this novel. For example, there’s a brothel that specialises in vN children, recalling the paedophile from book one who kept two child-sized vN so that he wouldn’t harm ‘real’ children. It’s not for sensitive readers, but if you can handle it, it raises all sorts of weighty questions and ideas. Should morality change when we’re dealing with robot people instead of human people? What kinds of relationships can exist between humans and vN?

As Ashby stated in last week’s guest post, the people who use vN are typically those who want to avoid the difficulties of relationships with humans. They want someone who they can treat like a machine, who can be relied on to behave in simple, predictable ways, and, sometimes, who can be abused in ways that would be criminal with a human. In the prologue, a scientist who seems to have something like Asperger’s describes his relationship with the vN Susie as his ideal, because he gets all the sex he wants without having to deal with any of the emotion.

That’s not to say humans and vN can’t have meaningful relationships. In book one, Amy’s father Jack really seemed to love his vN wife Charlotte. As Javier mentions in iD, that is the ideal that vN hope for – to find a human (preferably a rich one) who will shelter but not abuse them. Javier often receives such offers, and he genuinely likes some of the people he sleeps with. I find it sad though – he doesn’t really consider falling in love with a human; he can only hope that he won’t be abused by one. The potential long-term relationships he can have with human are inevitably compromises – a far cry from the companionship he shared with Amy.

And the vN can feel love – it’s what Amy and Javier feel for each other, despite their difficulties. They feel so much more besides, as the first part of the novel makes clear, as Amy and Javier struggle with the issue of sex. Javier’s sexual advances can be a little bit troubling, given that he keeps pushing while Amy keeps refusing. He’s not violent, but his persistence made me uncomfortable and Amy frequently distance herself from him as a result (which makes him feel like an asshole in turn). However, it’s it’s not Amy who needs protection, but Javier. They already have an intimate relationship – they sleep naked together, kiss, fool around. They are a couple and early on Javier starts calling her his wife. It’s only sex that Amy objects to. But, as Javier rightly points out, she’s being a hypocrite. She’s so worried about his failsafe, yet she refuses to remove it even though she has the power to do so.

I could talk about the nuances of these issues all day, but I should stop now before I spoil the subtleties of this book for you. I will make a few comments on the plot and pace though. The first part of the book really stood out for me – it was just brilliant. We learn a bit about the development of the vN at New Eden Ministries, and the god-complex of the humans behind the new technology. Then Amy’s island offers an amazing futuristic paradise, while the character relationships kept me hooked on the story. When Javier brought this section to an end it felt so devastating that I paused to take it in.

What follows is more frantic and action-packed, but admittedly I didn’t love it quite as much as the preceding parts. It’s Ashby’s depiction of vN experiences and Javier’s character that captured me rather than the story. The ending was also too sentimental for my tastes, but on the other hand it balances out the more harrowing content. Javier’s quest takes precedence, but it’s also tied up with the fact that the vN as a whole also find themselves at the start of either their revolution or their apocalypse – developments that are both exciting and complex. There’s a lot going on, and, as with vN, I sometimes struggled to keep track of all the locations, characters, and objectives. That’s not to say it wasn’t a fantastic read, but I may have to read it again before I read book three, which I will definitely be reading. I seldom read series, so my excitement about books two and three is both rare and telling. Do I even need to mention that I really think you should read this book?

I also suggest you check out some of the interviews and guest posts Madeline has been doing for iD blog tour. She speaks about her books, of course, but also offers broader discussions of the ideas within them:

Guest Posts
On robot, human and other subjectivities at the Little Red Reviewer

On gender at Uncorked Thoughts
On female writers in the sf and dystopian markets at Escapism
On making non-humans seem human at Civilian Reader
On fear and being unable to go home at John Scalzi’s The Big Idea
And for the sake of convenience, here’s another link to Madeline’s Violin in a Void guest post on the relationship between humans and AI.

Interviews
My Bookish Ways
The Quillery
A Fantastical Librarian
Interview with Javier at My Shelf Confessions

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2 thoughts on “iD by Madeline Ashby

  1. I will definitely be reading iD again before reading the 3rd book (whenever that comes out). I really should have read the end of vN before diving into iD, refreshed myself on some of the minor characters and world set up and such.

    it’s nice to run into a male character who fucks his way up the ladder, so to speak. Ashby’s flipped some tropes here, making Amy the ultra-powerful character, and making Javier the super sexy and sometimes powerless one.

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